The Power of Imprinting

Here’s something special for you with my thanks to Mental Management Systems.

I used one of Lanny Bassham’s books, With Winning in Mind, when I was representing Great Britain in archery.

It was also the inspiration to write my book, Succeed in Sport.  Lanny especially liked my use of symbols to record performance levels.

I was lucky enough to have a day’s mental management training with Lanny and his son Troy when they came to Britain.

Troy, Jackie, Lanny at Bisley

 Here’s a piece by Brian Bassham we can all use.

Have you ever seen a book titled, “The Power of Negative Thinking?” I haven’t and I believe the reason is because it works and is easy to do. We live in a negative environment where it’s easy to beat yourself up, vent to others why things are bad, and focus on the things not going well. It’s easy to be negative and takes no effort. With that said, if one practices having positive thoughts, it becomes easier for them to be positive instead of negative.

The power of imprinting is real, both negative and positive. I’ve known people who seem to only have bad luck. They are the same people who focus on the negative. The Eeyores of the world that can’t catch a break to save their life. What if, those same people changed their thought process? What if you only focused on the positive and left the negative at the door? How much better would life be? How much more could you accomplish?

The Self-Image needs two ingredients to grow, 1) Confirmation from others and 2) Confirmation from self. Let’s take a look at the first ingredient, confirmation from others. You must have a strong circle of people who lift you up. Think about the 5 people you spend most of your time around and ask yourself this question, “Do I feel better about myself when I’m around them?” If the answer is yes, keep them in your circle. If the answer is no, protect yourself. I’m not saying you should remove them out of your life. What I am saying is that if you want to reach your true potential you must interact with people who build you up.

The second ingredient can be difficult for some but it is necessary if you want to have a strong Self-Image. There are 3 types of imprints: Actual Imprints, Environmental Imprints, and Imagined Imprints. Both actual imprints and environmental imprints are out of your control. However, Imagined Imprints are in your control. What you choose to think about, write about, and talk about is up to you. Choose to think Helpful thoughts, write down Positive Affirmations, and talk about what you want to have happen helps build your Self-Image.

In the book, “With Winning in Mind” there is a section titled, “Building a Better You.” In my opinion, it’s the most important portion of the book. You have the POWER to change the Self-Image that you currently have to the Self-Image you desire by using the power of imprinting. First, make the decision that you are willing to change. Only you can make that choice. Second, identify specifically the habits and/or attitudes that you need to change. You must be specific. Third, identify the new Self-Image that is in direct conflict with your old one. Finally, only IMPRINT the new habits and/or attitudes of the desired new Self-Image.

Imprinting positive thoughts and focusing on the new habits and/or attitudes will also create conflict within your current Self-Image. Only two things can happen; you become the person you desire by continuing to change your thoughts or you stay being who you are by stopping those imprints. The Self-Image hates conflict so this process is not easy but knowing that if you stick with your positive imprints long enough the Self-Image will change can be the motivation you need to keep going. Imprinting is in your control, control your thoughts and you can accomplish anything you put your mind to.

Written by: Brian Bassham

Mental Coach – Mental Management Systems

brian@mentalmanagement.com

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Quote of the Month – World Obesity Day

It’s World Obesity Day today.

If diets worked there would be really one diet, everybody would go on it, lose weight and that would be the end of it.

Jon Gabriel

But 95% of diets don’t work (other than short-term).  So what’s the answer? Don’t diet, learn to eat well.

Real, fresh food is the solution.

World Obesity Day

Action on Sugar

Shapes and Colours

As I walk through town looking at the gardens, the flowers may be fading but the leaves are turning copper and gold and the apples hang red on the trees. Whatever the season, there are wonderful shapes and colours in nature. This is how our food should be too.

There are many types of fish and they’re fish-shaped, not oblong, battered or crumbed. It’s easy to add your own toppings if you like. Fresh meat will have been cut up into large joints with individual shapes or small pieces. There can be a world of difference between a bought burger and some mince to make your own and between chicken nuggets and a free-range drumstick.

Take a look at your shopping as it goes along the supermarket conveyor belt. Is it all beige? Is it all square? I wrote a little rhyme:

 

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA

When you go to the shops

If it comes in a box

Let it stay on the shelf

For the sake of your health

 

Each type of food brings its own special nutrients. Eating the same things every day can leave you with deficiencies and makes intolerance more likely. Most people have loads of recipe books and eat the same dozen meals all the time. Mix them up: white meat one day, fish another, then red meat, perhaps an omelette, or have a boost with liver or oily fish. Have rice or quinoa sometimes rather than always potatoes. Challenge yourself to buy a wider variety of vegetables. Eat two types with each meal, different colours. If you have something starchy, pair it with something non-starchy eg carrots with green beans, peas with red cabbage, sweet corn with pak choi. It’ll be a feast for your eyes on the conveyor belt and your plate.

Top tip – buy some foods with shapes and colours.

Quote of the month

Cooking is without doubt one of the most important skills a person can learn.

Jamie Oliver

There are loads of recipes on his website and YouTube channel.  I love his chicken and mushroom pie.  He does it in no time.  It takes me ages (I make my own gluten-free shortcrust pastry) but it’s so delicious it’s worth it.

I’ve also just bought a copy of his new book ‘5 Ingredients’ – brilliant if you’re new to cooking and want to keep things simple.

Retire Healthy

If work’s been quiet that’s all about to change as schools start back and holidays finish. But for some of you work might be nearing its end with retirement weeks, months or only a year away. Are you ready for it?

When you’re young, you’re invincible (well that’s how it seems). You can take on the world and withstand any assault. Ambitions run high. You sacrifice your time, relationships and health to your career as you climb up the management ladder. One day you wake up and realise there’s more to life and start counting the cost. All around you middle-aged friends and celebrities are suffering diverse ailments or dying too young.

Reclaiming your health suddenly takes priority as you think of all the things you still want to do with the time you’ll have. Whilst life expectancy has gone up as drugs stop us from dying, I doubt you aspire to eking out your later years battling some chronic condition in a care home. If, however, you’re up to it, the world will soon be your oyster.

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Eating well to avoid cancer, heart disease, diabetes or Alzheimer’s is like wearing a seat belt when you drive. It’s about risk reduction. Chronic health problems have increased as the national diet has deteriorated.

Add exercise, good sleep, happy relationships and time outside in the air and sunshine to lower your risk further. It’s never too late to start. Much of the damage of a miss-spent youth is reversible with some TLC.

The best time for positive action is always today.

Learn to eat well now, live well for longer.

Top tip – eat well and enjoy a healthy retirement.

My next course is at Lorton St Methodists, Cockermouth Wednesdays, 7:30pm, 20th September – 25th October.  Why not join us?  Book your place now and invest in your future.

 

Spend less; still eat well

The school holidays have started and while the kids rejoice, parents may worry how expensive the next six weeks might be. Food need not add to the pressure – you can eat well without spending a fortune.

A while ago, ITV ran a series Save Money Good Food. I’ve included a few of their tips here with some of mine.

Image result for food waste UK

The first way to save money is not to waste any of your food. A scandalous £12.5 billion of edible food is thrown away every year in the UK. Part of this is down to overbuying. Know what’s in your cupboard so you don’t repeat buy what you already have a home. We all love bargains and the BOGOF but when you buy a bargain and don’t eat it, you’re throwing your money straight into the bin. Do a bit of planning, shop with a list, cook in bulk, make good use of your freezer and learn to love leftovers (my favourite lunches).

When you pay for food, you don’t want added charges for labour. The super rich may employ private chefs but many ordinary people do too without realising. I’ve got a big downer on ready meals for lots of reasons and cost is just one. But even if you don’t go that far you might pop the odd packet of ready-chopped something in your trolley. Salad perhaps or some fruit for the kids. Ready chopped produce is 3 to 5 times more expensive. That’s 300 to 500% more. It takes less than a minute to chop an apple / carrot / onion / bit of lettuce. The more prep you do yourself, the lower the cost and the fresher the produce. By using it straight away you keep more precious nutrients and flavour. Plus you avoid eating something that’s been dipped in a chemical solution and packed in a modified atmosphere to stop it giving away its age by turning brown (see Swallow This by Joanna Blythman).

Fresh herbs soon wilt or dry up and die so why not plant them out to increase their yield 100 fold. See my Herb Garden post.

Cereal – a poor choice for breakfast

We only started eating cornflakes in 1922 so we clearly don’t need breakfast cereal from a biological viewpoint. Really it’s highly processed carbohydrate with good PR and marketing. It will put your blood sugar up, damage your health and cause weight gain. People think that the cereals with less added sugar are good for you. They aren’t as damaging as the high sugar types of course but the corn/rice/wheat itself will still be quickly broken down into sugar by your body’s enzymes. Ditch the box cereals and enjoy a good quality muesli or natural porridge oats (beware the sachets – see Oats so Expensive on Survival Guide for the Skint).

Better still go to work on an egg. Have it with own brand smoked salmon and you’ll feel satisfied right through to lunchtime and save more money and health damage by not needing to buy snacks.

Here are some other pieces I’ve written on breakfasts:

The Great English Breakfast

Eat a Good Breakfast

And what about the most nutritious food of all? It’s also one of the cheapest – liver. You can feed a family of four for £3.

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Sardines come second for nutrition. If you don’t like them on their own, here’s my recipe for sardine pate:

  • 1 tin of sardines in brine, drained
  • 2oz butter (that’s ¼ block or 50g)
  • 2oz full-fat cream cheese (¼ small tub or 55g)
  • Juice of half a lemon
  • Salt and pepper and some fresh parsley
  • Optional ½ teaspoon of French mustard)

Put it all in a bowl and mash with a fork until well mixed.  Serve with a crisp salad.

Enjoy the holidays and I hope you get better weather than the rain that poured as I wrote this!

Top tip – learn to spend less and still eat well.

Foraging

When I’m out in the woods doing field archery, I’m usually picking something to eat, much to the surprise of my companions. If they pluck up courage to accept a taste, they marvel at the citrus freshness of young wood-sorrel leaves and the sweet nectar you can suck from the base of red clover flowers. I can often be seen chewing on the stems of sorrel or wild grasses. Later in the summer, some woods will have wild strawberries and raspberries too.

Bilberry picking, 2016

Come the autumn, it’s time for blackberries and bilberries (which put blue berries in the shade, both as a super food and for intensity of flavour). These deserve a dedicated collecting trip. A couple of bags in the freezer lasts for months as a topping for Greek yoghurt at breakfast or the magic ingredient in a lilac smoothie.

With 75 % of the world’s food provided by just 12 plants and 5 animal species, it’s no wonder that food allergies, intolerances and digestive difficulties are increasing. Your body thrives on variety.

Urban lifestyles and screen addiction mean that few children can name trees and flowers and don’t know what can be eaten and, most importantly, what’s poisonous and shouldn’t be touched. Richard Louv (author of Last Child in the Woods) called these kids ‘nature-deficient’ and links this to the worrying trends in childhood obesity, ADHD and depression.

Although I’ve read more about foraging in recent years, I learned most of what I know as a child out with my parents and grandparents.  And we were always picking something for wine making including sticky dandelions, delicate gorse petals (ouch!) and foamy white heads of elderflower.  In the war our grandparents put dandelion leaves in salad – perhaps with the resurgence of stronger tasting leaves like rocket, today’s generation would again find them appealing.

Top tip – teach your children and grandchildren what you know.