Scary Times

Halloween is coming up soon. It’s the evening before All Saints’ Day, literally, all hallows even. Houses and shops are currently festooned with scary stuff. But for me there’s something even more scary.

I got this flyer through the post – encouraging me to spend money on sugar and chemical laden drinks and snacks to damage the health of children.

Junk foods are often advertised as ‘treats’. Something special to be enjoyed. It’s true I am a grumpy old woman these days but it makes me angry that they take advantage like this. Here we are in the European country that eats the most processed food and has the worst health and they want to profit from making it worse!

The biggest cause of child hospitalisation is for surgical tooth extraction – sometimes because teeth are so rotted by sugar they all have to be removed.

Rather than clamp down on manufacturers or adopt policies to help with teeth cleaning (like the Child Smile programme in Scotland where fluoridation is illegal), the Government now wants to put toxic fluoride in all of England’s water. Most countries of the world do not do this and rates of tooth decay are the same as countries that do.

Fluoride is very poisonous and damaging to health in many ways, particularly the brain. Applying it directly to teeth may be helpful (eg in toothpaste, which you may or may not have noticed comes with warnings against swallowing it!). Taking it systemically does not have the same effect. Water fluoridation is unethical mass-medication without informed consent and with no dose control. And it brings a host of problems including reduced IQ in children. I’ve signed the Government petition against it and you can too here.

So back to the Halloween sugar problem. If you want a fun time on 31st October, look for other ways to provide treats.

What about going on a nature walk and looking for the scariest insect or creepiest tree branch? You could hold a party or play some games, do something crafty, make some tasty pumpkin soup or roast what you hollow out from your lantern.

Top tip – find better treats than junk food.

Quote of the Month – Misinformation

The lies of Big Food and Bad Pharma are destroying lives on an unprecedented scale.

Dr Aseem Malhotra

Dr Malhotra has been appointed Chair of the Public Health Collaboration and is taking the first step to clean up the health and medical information mess that continues to harm millions of people on a daily basis.  Here is his short video on the state of misinformation.

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He says the charity PHC is an army ready to take action to clean up the health and medical misinformation mess that continues to harm millions of people on a daily basis

 

Other quotes on this theme:

Science has taken a turn towards darkness. Possibly half the medical literature may simply be untrue.

Richard Horton

Editor in Chief, the Lancet

Is it time to assume all health research is fraudulent until it can be proved otherwise?

Richard Smith

Former Editor of the British Medical Journal

 

 

Eat Well, Feel Good

Has lockdown left you overweight, tired and fed up?

Enjoy a more vibrantly healthy life. Learn to Eat Well.

Here’s my latest blog post –

I’m invariably late cottoning on to what everyone else has been doing for ages, so it was only recently I started doing some Joe Wick’s workouts.

I love them!

I started with the ‘Wake Up With Joe’ series and the other day I did the 1 Jan 2021 workout. Joe started the year by reading a letter he’d written.

Like most of us (including me) he has found Lockdown has affected his mental health, motivation, energy and mood.

He says you never regret a workout and he always feels better after some exercise.

He encouraged people to exercise in lots of different ways, not just focused on losing weight, but to get stronger, fitter and feel better.

As I listened, I thought about the parallels with food.

My work is all about people feeling great and having confidence choosing food that will boost their energy and health.

The main thing people enjoy when they learn to eat well is more energy. It’s almost instant. My old habits of cereal for breakfast and sandwiches for lunch gave me a feeling of fatigue that dragged me down. I’ll never go back to them because now I eat differently I enjoy feeling bright and ready for action.

Feeling good is the best motivator to carry on eating well.

Weight loss is a happy side-effect.

Joe also spoke about goals – not what you want in the end (outcome goals) but things you commit to do (process goals).

eg. resistance exercise each week is a doing goal to increase your strength.

Applying the same idea to food, a goal could be to eat one good meal each day.

I suggest starting with a real-food breakfast. If the first thing you eat (at whatever time) is good, it’s easier to keep eating good things later on.

Like increasing your resistance training as you find it easier, you could then progress to eating a real food lunch as well as breakfast.

Give it a go and feel good.

Top tip: To enjoy a more vibrantly healthy life, Learn to Eat Well!

 

For a Good Day, Eat a Good Breakfast

Some say breakfast is the most important meal of the day.

I say it’s the most important meal to get right.

Sadly, years of mis-information, marketing and confusion mean it’s often the worst meal of the day consisting of little more than processed carbohydrate (here’s why that’s bad).

The trick is to find things you know will last you through to lunchtime. That’s very unlikely to be breakfast cereal or jam on toast which can set you up for rapid hunger, unhealthy snacking later on, and weight gain. Eating no breakfast can be preferable to bad breakfast.

Some of my clients have improved their weight and health simply by changing their breakfast habits.

  Here are some ideas that might suit you better.  They use the principle that every meals should contain plants, proteins and fats.

Some people do well on porridge made from natural oats. (Beware the type in sachets as some contain loads of sugar.) To add some protein and fat, top with nuts and seeds and a dollop of cream. For plants sprinkle on a spoonful of berries.

Boost your weight loss with low-carb porridge. It doesn’t have any oats! Mix ground flax seed, chia seed, desiccated coconut and protein powder with some coconut milk and warm until thick. Top with a bit of fruit, some full-fat plain yoghurt and a few flaked almonds.

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Muesli can be goodchoose one with plenty of nuts and not much dried fruit. Again, top with full-fat plain yoghurt.

Granola is less good as it’s generally sweetened and cooked in vegetable oil. If you enjoy it, it’s definitely worth making your own using coconut oil.

Smoothies are quick to make and easy to consume and with the right ingredients can keep you satisfied for 5 or 6 hours.

Base them on coconut milk, avocado, ground almonds, flax, spinach, protein powder, peanut butter, cream, eggs, yoghurt etc.

Add just a little fruit for sweetness eg ¼ apple, 1” banana or a spoonful of berries. (Fruit is sugar so an all-fruit smoothie (bought or home-made) is not a healthy option.)

To save time, you can batch up any dry ingredients in advance so that in the morning you just tip them into the glass with your veg, fruit and milk choice, whizz with a stick blender and drink straight from the glass.

Dry ingredients ready to tip in

Fry-ups can sustain you for ages. For traditional Full English, choose from bacon, egg, black pudding, sausage, mushroom, tomato. Another favourite of mine is the Aussie classic – steak and egg – fab with wilted spinach.

Fancy something a little lighter? Go continental with boiled eggs, ham and cheese (you can save time by hard boiling an egg the night before).

Dip avocado or buttered, wholemeal toast ‘soldiers’ in soft-boiled eggs.

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In the summer, Jon Gabriel’s light but satisfying plain yoghurt mixed with nuts, seeds, protein powder and fruit is hard to beat.

 

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For a change, go fishy with a tin of mackerel plus half a pear and some seeds or indulge in smoked salmon, delicious teamed with scrambled eggs and courgette.

Top tip: To have a good day, eat a good breakfast.

Quotes of the Month – Health

Three quotes today

1.

The real pandemic is poor metabolic health, or metabolic inflexibility.

Aseem Malhotra

Poor metabolic health makes us vulnerable to obesity, diabetes and a severe outcome when we catch the coronavirus. If you want to lose weight, it’s best to do it in a way that protects your metabolic health, by eating well.

Here’s an article co-authored by Dr Malhotra on the change of food environment that’s needed, starting with the NHS itself.

2.

I wouldn’t start from here

Lewis Carol

(with thanks to @Beth Pipe for reminding me of this one!)

3.

How random and fragile life can be.

Megan Divine

We can’t control the things in life that hit us. We’re going through pain with no rhyme, reason or cure. But we can control how we care for and nurture ourselves and each other.

 

 

V – Virus Resilience

It’s almost winter. The virus is still with us. No nutrition can stop you catching it – so we comply with whatever rules and restrictions are in place at the time.

 

What you can influence is what happens if you do catch it. Young healthy people will mostly be fine. If you’re older, your risk of serious illness increases. You can’t change your age but you can reduce your risk when you improve:

  • your health
  • your weight
  • your blood sugar stability
  • your Vitamin D level

Looking after yourself is always worth it.

That’s why for November I’m offering reduced price consultations (£65 → £49) to people who want to take positive action.

Book now jackie@learntoeatwell.co.uk

What you eat and drink really matters so here are some tips to help you.

Eat more:

  • Oily fish and eggs for vitamin D which has many health benefits, including priming our T cells

  • Vegetables which give you lots of vitamins, minerals, enzymes and antioxidants plus fibre to feed the good bacteria in your gut

  • Live natural yoghurt, kefir, lassi and fermented vegetables to repopulate your good bacteria

  • Coconut oil which has anti-bacterial and anti-viral properties

Supplement with:

  • Vitamin D (most of us are short of this unless we supplement – especially at this time of year when the sun is low).  The risk of needing intensive care is greatly reduced by having enough vitamin D.

  • Magnesium (most people are deficient)

  • Selenium (2 or 3 Brazil nuts a day is plenty)

  • Zinc (good food sources are seafood, lamb, turkey and pumpkin seeds)

  • Vitamin C

Avoid:

  • Sugar – it feeds bad bacteria, unbalancing your system

  • Processed food – you want your body to cope with the virus, not use all its energy fighting fake food

  • Alcohol

Other tips:

  • Eat right for your metabolic type (ask me about a test)

  • Get lots of sleep to make the powerful anti-oxidant melatonin

  • Exercise, especially out in the fresh air when it’s not pouring down and blowing a gale. It will help you sleep better too.

  • If you smoke, give it up now

  • Wash with actual bar soap whenever you possibly can. Coronaviruses are in a fatty ‘envelope’ which can be destroyed by soap. Also soap won’t damage your own protective bacterial like antibacterials do. Joanna Blythman retweeted this Tweet thread on why soap is so good.

  • Solutions of ethyl alcohol and isopropyl alcohol at between 60% and 80%, plus 3% hydrogen peroxide are effective for cleaning surfaces

  • Manage stress and prioritise self-care; your mental health, physical health and immune system are connected. We’ve really been through the wringer this year and very few folk are on top form. It helps to keep a sense of purpose and optimism. We won’t get back to normal for some time yet so look after yourself and do things that give you joy.

Top tips: Eat well and support your health.

 

Grow Your Own

 

I’ve loved getting emails from people saying they’ve started to grow veg during lockdown. Time spent with living plants is good for you and your efforts are rewarded with the amazing taste and superior nutrition of home-grown.

My favourite gardening programme, The Beechgrove Garden, had this handy idea.

When you have nearly finished a head of celery, cut the last few stems, leaving about 3” (10cm). Pop in a glass of water on the windowsill for 2 or 3 weeks until you can see roots growing, then plant in the garden. Here’s what you get!!!

On a smaller scale, herbs have health benefits and add wonderful flavours to your cooking. You can grow them in the garden, in pots outside or even on the windowsill in your kitchen. If you don’t want to start from seed, you can buy herbs in pots at the supermarket, harvest some to freeze then plant out the rest to keep on growing.

Sprouted seeds and beans are salad as fresh as fresh can be and eaten raw they pack a powerful enzyme punch. Grow them on your worktop in sprouting trays – they don’t even need soil. This video shows you how.

Quote of the Month – A is for Artificial

Following my 10 ten tips series, here’s the first of my a-z of nutrition and health snippets. All on LinkedIn.

 

A is for artificial

The thing about the way most food is produced these days is, if you knew the story behind it, you wouldn’t want to eat it

Eric Schlosser, food journalist

 

In Britain we eat less real food than healthy European countries like France.

Check out Joanna Blythman’s Swallow This for a read that will make your hair curl.

Good news – the only way is up!

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For lasting change, convert your habits to real food tackling one meal at a time – until the artificial food is squeezed out.

Choose what you’ll improve first – your mid-morning snack perhaps. Could you by-pass the vending machine and instead have nuts or a piece of cheese with an apple?

A real food breakfast instead of cereal from a packet could transform your day. Here are some breakfast ideas.

Added bonus – you won’t need a mid-morning snack at all.😉

Making your own lunch instead of buying a sandwich could save you lots of money too.

Take your pick and make one of your meals the health-boosting highlight of the day.

If you want to learn to eat well but find all the messages confusing, I can show you how. My next Eat for a Better Life course starts at the end of the month. Contact me now to book your place jackie@learntoeatwell.co.uk

Obesity Strategy

Have news reports about obesity and coronavirus alarmed you? Do they make you determined to lose the weight that’s putting your life in greater danger?

Boris has certainly been spurred into action by his time in hospital. He realised that carrying extra weight is one of the highest risk factors for becoming seriously ill with COVID19.

Obesity also makes you more likely to suffer from heart disease, diabetes, several types of cancer, fatty liver, respiratory disease, and mental health problems.

To tackle all of this the Government has launched a strategy to slim down the nation.

Pexels

So what is their focus?

Calories.

Sorry, that’s how we got into this mess in the first place. Calories don’t help you make good food choices; they drive you towards processed foods.

Surely cutting calories helps. Will you not burn more energy than you eat?

Only for a while.

Our bodies are survival machines. Cut the food you eat and your body shuts down your metabolism and hangs on in there until it can put all the weight back on again. That’s why 100 people on a diet will all lose weight but later 95 of them will find themselves back where they started or even heavier than before. And the cycle will repeat.

Let’s go back to the beginning. What are people eating now that causes obesity and poor health? Food-like products. And that includes the low-calorie ones.

  • They’re addictive – so you over-eat.
  • Chemicals make them taste great – so you over-eat.

  • They’re low in the nutrients your body needs – so you over-eat.

  • They interfere with your body’s control mechanisms and stimulate appetite – so you over-eat.

  • The label says they’re healthy – so you’re fooled into thinking it’s OK to over-eat.

    A Colin Shelbourne cartoon from Survival Guide for the Skint.

Since calories became popular and the food industry got into gear 50 years ago, the weight of the average Briton has gone through the roof whilst health is in an ever steepening decline.

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The Government rightly blames advertising and the food environment we live in. We’ve been brainwashed into buying this junk and thinking it’s an acceptable way to feed our bodies. Offers are always for extra junk, not BOGOF on cabbages or steak. They’ve recognised this and I’m glad they’re introducing some controls.

What can you do?

Britain’s health was best between 1950 and 1970. Almost everyone was slim. Almost everyone ate real food.

Real food works with your natural appetite controls. When food satisfies you, there’s no need for will-power and no desire to over-eat.

I so hope you’ve all got used to doing your own cooking during lockdown and that you’ve been soothed by the rhythm of spending time in the kitchen, enjoyed what you ate and noticed how much money you saved.

It’s a missed opportunity but in reality the Government is unlikely ever to tell people to eat real food; they don’t want to damage the processed food industry.

So it’s down to you.

  • You can take control. 🙂

  • You can choose better food. 🙂

  • You can care for your body and nourish it. 🙂

Top tip: To be slim and healthy, forget the calories and learn to eat well.