Quote of the Month

In the last 10 years, a theory that had somehow held up unsupported for nearly half a century has been rejected by several comprehensive evidence reviews, even as it staggers on, zombie-like, in our dietary guidelines and medical advice.

Ian Leslie in The Guardian

On the diet-heart hypothesis and the sugar conspiracy

Illustration by Pete GamlenPete Gamlen

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Sugar Blues

Hypoglycaemia (low blood sugar) results in hunger, shakiness, weakness, dizziness, irritability and depression. I should know; for years I suffered on a daily basis. The cause – too much sugar. High blood sugar stimulated my body to produce insulin, which took the sugar back out of my blood (and made me fat). I didn’t understand the problem so I tried to control my symptoms with regular biscuits, bananas and chocolate. It was a disaster. At archery competitions, I ate sugar even more frequently. I just got headaches and felt awful.

My first inkling of the cause

Cereal - a poor choice for breakfast

Cereal – a poor choice for breakfast

was at work. Biscuits were provided in meetings; if I ate one I got hungry but if I abstained I was OK. My second clue came when dieting to lose the weight I’d gained eating so many biscuits; I was less hungry eating a little cereal for breakfast than a lot.  Also I noticed the low-fat yoghurts I bought weren’t satisfying, they just increased my appetite.  Now I know it’s because of the sugar they put in low-fat products to make them palateable.

 

Sugar has a toxic effect on the body and causes myriad health problems besides hypoglycemia. For centuries doctors have cured their patients of many ailments by replacing sugar with quality vegetable and whole grain carbohydrates and for centuries consumption has increased sweeping aside all resistance. In the 11th Century, brewers caught adding sugar to beer were dragged through the City of Chester in a cart with the overnight refuse of the privies. In the early 1900s, America had laws against “substances injurious to health” (like sugar) being added to food. Manufacturers (including Coca-Cola) opposed this, got the government on side and the health of the whole nation deteriorated as a result of the adulterated products that are now their main food. In the 1950s, Dr Gyland wrote papers to warn and help others but couldn’t get them published.  In Britain, Professor John Yudkin tried to fight Ancel Keys and his lipid hypothesis having found a stronger corrolation between sugar and heart disease than there is with fat – he was sqashed.  Even Keys himself couldn’t get published a paper he wrote late in his life against the direction nutritional advice has taken.  Little has changed.  Those reaping the profits still don’t want you to know the truth – sugar wrecks your health.

Top Tip – Stop eating sugar

NB Diabetics will need to balance their medication with their sugar intake.

To learn more about the sorry history of sugar in our food, read Sugar Blues by William Dufty and Pure, White and Deadly by John Yudkin.  Here’s a Daily Telegraph artcle on the latter; we still have the same sugar-industry-led problem today.

 

Dementia Fear

I am not a brave person; many things frighten me: IMAG0312injury – I was very fortunate to escape with only whiplash and bruises last year when someone drove across a junction and took the front off my car; cancer – of course; loss of mental faculties – for me the worst of all.

Currently in vogue, the carb heavy, low fat diet that has led to the obesity and diabetes epidemics has also been linked in new studies with Alzheimer’s (first referred to as type 3 diabetes in 2005).

"3DSlicer-KubickiJPR2007-fig6" by Kubicki M., McCarley R.W., Westin C-F., Park H-J., Maier S.E., Kikinis R., Jolesz F.A., Shenton M.E. A review of diffusion tensor imaging studies in schizophrenia. J Psychiatr Res. 2007 Jan-Feb;41(1-2):15-30. PMID: 16023676. PMCID: PMC2768134.. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Commons - https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:3DSlicer-KubickiJPR2007-fig6.jpg#/media/File:3DSlicer-KubickiJPR2007-fig6.jpg

“3DSlicer-KubickiJPR2007-fig6” by Kubicki M., McCarley R.W., Westin C-F., Park H-J., Maier S.E., Kikinis R., Jolesz F.A., Shenton M.E. A review of diffusion tensor imaging studies in schizophrenia. J Psychiatr Res. 2007 Jan-Feb;41(1-2):15-30. PMID: 16023676. PMCID: PMC2768134.. Licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Commons – https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:3DSlicer-KubickiJPR2007-fig6.jpg#/media/File:3DSlicer-KubickiJPR2007-fig6.jpg

What to do? Minimise sugar and cut down on processed grains. Eat some plant food at each meal. Vegetables are good carbs giving you vitamins, minerals and fibre; their antioxidants protect your brain. Berries contain antioxidants too plus other beneficial phytonutrients.  Celery, peppers and carrots contain luteolin which may calm inflammation in your brain.

FishYour brain is mostly made of fat so get plenty of omega 3s (eg from oily fish, chia seed or walnuts) and keep down your Nutsintake of damaged omega 6 (eg processed vegetable oil). Eat butter, olive oil, coconut oil and foods like nuts and avocados.

The spice turmeric contains curcumin, an anti-inflammatory antioxidant. Curcumin has been shown to boost memory and stimulate the production of new brain cells. For the B vitamin choline, eat eggs, meat, broccoliEggs and cauliflower. Choline may boost brain power and slow age-related memory loss. Red meat is an excellent source of vitamin B12 which is vital for brain function. When you’re short of B12, your brain actually gets smaller.

IMAG0057Other ways to keep your mental sharpness: physical exercise, standing up regularly to break continuous sitting, mindfulness, knitting, word or number puzzles, learning a language, making music, a stimulating career, social interaction.

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Top tip – eat well for the sake of your brain

 

Junk Food Kids

I was heartbroken to watch a four year old girl having 8 rotten teeth surgically removed on Channel 4’s Junk Food Kids – Who’s to Blame?  Also featured were a boy with fatty liver disease and an obese 13y old girl whose parents wanted her to have gastric band surgery in preference to improving the family’s diet.   For all of these, typical fare at home was ready meals, takeaways, jacket potatoes with baked beans, piles of pasta, pizza, crisps, chocolate and sweet drinks – all guaranteed to pile weight on and rot teeth. The social media backlash accused parents of child abuse for letting their kids eat so badly but the parents were at their wits end. To them processed, sugary diets were normal and they didn’t know what to do to make them better.

Nutrition experts have campaigned many times for governmental control on sugar use by food and drink manufacturers. The government declined arguing that consumers can choose. Can they really? Manufacturers spend huge sums on advertising – and it works. Junk food is cheap, easy, quick and everyone eats it don’t they? Parents are left with a battle on their hands, parental discipline isn’t fashionable and a third of our children are overweight, many with bad teeth, both of which are entirely preventable.

What can we do? It seems the government isn’t going to help us and the manufacturers won’t so we need to support each other in raising awareness so that drinking water and eating real food become normal again.  A dentist near where I live has created a Sugar Shock poster showing the amount of sugar in different drinks. It’s brilliant! I had no idea that flavoured milk is worst of all. A local cafe has a lovely Michael Pollen quote on their wall ‘don’t eat anything your great grandmother wouldn’t recognise as food’.  What can you do to help spread the message?

Top tip – for the sake of the children, lets help get each other back into real food

How to read food labels

I am a person who tends to move at speed; this is not always a good thing. A while ago, in the supermarket, I failed to notice the state of the floor as I rounded the corner of an aisle. Someone had dropped a glass jar of tomato sauce and I slipped in the huge sticky mess on the floor.  My foot was now covered so I stood stranded in the red splat.  Walking on would have spread it far and wide and other people might have slipped too.  Plaintively, I called for help.

While I was stranded, a lovely lady came along who was trying to see the jars of sauces.  I apologised for being in her way and asked what she wanted.  It turned out she was doing pizza and didn’t know which tomato sauce to buy for the topping.  I suggested she make her own instead, but she didn’t know how.  So we had a little chat.

Later she came back.  She had looked at theCherry toms tomato puree I suggested but said that her chosen jar contained less sugar.  By the time a supermarket herorine with a mop came to rescue me (bless you), the pizza lady had gone.  But I was puzzled.  Surely tomato puree doesn’t conatin any sugar, only tomatoes.  So I went to investigate.

I realised that the lady had looked at the nutritional breakdown part of the label, where it said ‘of which sugars’.  This is about carbohydrate content.  Vegetables and fruits are primarily carbohydrate so the percentage was high.  The ingredients list stated simply, tomatoes – there was no sugar.  The jar on the other hand had lots of added sugar.  I once saw someone advise that a sugary breakfast cereal was a better choice than natural muesli on the basis of the nutritional breakdown.  That is complete nonsense.  Since that part of the label seems to cause confusion, it can be more helpful to skip it.

For me, what matters is the list of ingredients.  No 1, is there a list of ingredients?  When you buy a tomato, a cauliflower or a piece of meat, there is no list of ingredients.  Fresh, natural foods are always best.  No 2, is there added sugar?  Look for any word ending in ‘ose’ and other terms such as modified maize starch.  Sweeteners are as bad if not worse.  Each type of sugar might be listed separately so you have to add them up.  Notice how the percentage is given for many ingredients but often left a mystery for the sugar.  You can take a guess because the ingredients are listed in order of content, with the highest first.  No 3, is it made with vegetable/sunflower oil?  No 4, are there lots of chemical additives?  These might be emulsifiers, stabilisers, artificial colours and flavours.

Next time you reach for a jar, packet or box of anything ready-made, pause to consider whether you could avoid eating so much sugar, sweeteners, vegetable oil and additives by making a healthier version yourself starting with fresh, natural ingredients.

Top tip: Know what’s in your food.

 

Weight Gain Puzzle – The Answer

Last month I confidently declared that the reason Im slim now is the way I eat, not just luck, because twice I have been overweight. At the time, I had no idea why I was needing to stitch denim pieces into the top of my jeans to let the waist out. Like most overweight people in our media dominated world with its images of the body beautiful, I was deeply unhappy with my fat stomach. Later, knowing more about nutrition, I realised that the causes of my increased girth the first time were sandwiches and biscuits. The second time, the culprits were bread, potatoes, pasta and too little fat; the result of advice from a sports nutritionist.

If you know your food types you’ll have spotted that both times my problem was too much starchy carbohydrate. The second time this was exacerbated by having cut my saturated fat intake, never expecting that would be a bad thing. You might also recognise that the way I was eating was the way we’re all told to eat. Remember the food pyramid? Now we have the eat well plate. Both place great emphasis on starchy carbohydrate.

Tot up the portions of starchy carbohydrate you eat in a day starting with breakfast (breakfast cereal, croissants, toast), then lunch (sandwiches, wraps, jacket potatoes), dinner (potatoes, pasta, rice, peas, carrots) and snacks (crisps, crackers).

I can’t begin to fathom why we’re advised to eat in a way that has resulted in over half our population being overweight and miserable. I can test to find out your individual ideal mix of proteins, fats and carbohydrates and discover how much starch you can handle. It’s probably less than you’d expect. For weight loss and energy gain, it’s well worth knowing and some simple changes could give you a boost.

Top tip: Go easy on the starch.