Quote of the month – Smoking

Did you give up smoking last week (no smoking day 13th March)?  If you did and you’re finding it tough – stay strong.  If not, the best day to do it is today.

I lost my wonderful Mum and my fabulous Nana to lung cancer.

Mum and I in Keswick – happy times

For the sake of your loved ones who will miss you, and your own health, please stop smoking.

Helen Gerson said “There are only 2 sources of non-communicable disease – deficiency and toxicity”.

So don’t think vaping is much better; you’d still be taking chemical fumes into your lungs.  Read this sobering article from Dr Mercola.

 

Choosing What to Eat

You might have gone shopping this weekend.  How did you decide what to eat? When you’re walking round the supermarket, what factors determine what ends up in your trolley? Here are some common ones:

  • Cost – including what’s on offer, BOGOF

  • Convenience

  • Appearance

  • Habit

  • Cravings / addiction

  • Smell – especially round the bread!

  • What you like

  • Fat content

  • Hunger while shopping

Choosing food is clearly a complex operation.

So why do we eat?

We’ve come to think of food mainly as a source of energy, like petrol for the car. The simplicity of the idea is appealing but it’s only part of the story.

Nevertheless, since the introduction of calories as a measure, we’ve become obsessed with them. The calorie value of food has been elevated in importance beyond what it deserves. In spite of its popularity, calorific content is a poor basis for making food choices. In fact, it often drives us away from good foods and towards bad foods. You might have been led to believe that a calorie is a calorie regardless of source but I hope you’ll agree that whatever the calories say, a doughnut is not the same thing as a steak (Dr Andreas Eenfeldt).

Why else do we eat?

Our bodies need building material. Your cells and tissues are renewed all the time and the only things you body has to use for making new ones are the things you provide by eating. Substance and quality matter. You need protein – not just in total but including all the essential amino acids – to make muscles and chemical messengers. You need fats of the right shapes to make your cell membranes and hormones. You need vitamins and minerals and enzymes to support the zillions of chemical reactions going on inside. Not all the food you eat will contain these good things.

Are you getting enough goodness?

Recommended daily intakes are set at levels to avoid illness not at levels for optimum health or to cover increased demand eg if you are ill or under stress. Modern farming methods are degrading the soil so vegetables have lower levels of minerals (eg since 1940 carrots have lost 75% of their magnesium, 48% of their calcium, 46% of their iron and 75% of their copper.) Unripe foods are picked before their full nutrient potential has been reached so they can be transported long distances without spoilage. Processing of foods can damage or remove micronutrients. Good omega 3 fats might be taken out to increase shelf life while bad fats (eg damaged omega 6 fats like sunflower oil) are common ingredients. The trend is to eat grains such as wheat with every meal and these contain anti-nutrients (eg phytic acid) which block the absorption of minerals like iron, calcium, magnesium and zinc.

The result of all this is that much of our population today is over-fed but under-nourished. Deficiencies may not be so drastic as to show up as beriberi, scurvy or rickets (although that happens too) but may be revealed as tiredness, low mood, aches and pains, poor skin, hair and nails.

The impact of poor diet on your mental and physical abilities affects your whole life, including your work performance, fitness for sport and the fun you have with your family. That’s why I ask people to think first about nutrition.

Good food gives you essential amino acids, essential fatty acids, vitamins, minerals and enzymes. Major on fresh meat, fish, eggs, cheese, fruit, veg and natural fats. Do your own cooking. Put calories in the back seat, steer clear of processed foods and make your choices based primarily on the goodness real food contains.

Top tip: Choose your food for maximum nutrition

A Little of What You Fancy

The closer we get to Christmas, the more unhealthy stuff is shoved in front of our eyes and under our noses. There are office parties, family gatherings and all sorts of social occasions where people will pressure us to indulge more than we want to (often to make themselves feel better)

 “Go on, have another…”

Thankfully we don’t have to eat and drink everything on offer and suffer for it, or refuse it all and feel left out; we can take a middle road, use the 80/20 rule, join in without excess and enjoy a little of what you fancy.

There’s a saying:

Don’t worry what you eat between Christmas and New Year, it’s what you eat between New Year and Christmas that really matters.

If you’ve been taking care of yourself, your amazing body will cope with a bit of unhealthy stuff especially if you keep putting mostly good things inside you. Great breakfasts, super lunches, healthy snacks, fabulous dinners, all home-made mixtures of plants and proteins and fats. You’ll take it all in your stride.

Here’s a Jon Gabriel breakfast that seems light but is nutritious enough to last for several hours – fruit, full-fat natural yoghurt, ground flax, hemp, chia seeds, protein powder and I like to add some nuts – just stir it all together.

Of course, some people will dive in with gay abandon, intending to fix the damage in the New Year. If that’s you, going on a diet is unlikely to be helpful so resolve to build in some better eating habits or have some nutrition coaching and learn to eat well.

There will be presents as well as food and I leave you a quote I just saw from Bernard Manning:

I once bought my kids a set of batteries for Christmas

with a note on it saying

“Toys not included”

Merry Christmas!

Jackie

What Time to Eat?

I usually write about what to eat, but timing is important too.

Your body doesn’t just gear up to sleep when it’s dark and wake when it’s light; every part of it has control clocks.

Artificial light means we can eat from pre-dawn until midnight nowadays. Unfortunately, this disrupts our circadian rhythm and is bad for our health.

It’s best to eat during the day when levels of digestive enzymes are high and your liver and gut are ready to deal with food. In the evening, saliva production slows down.  Also, if anything enters the stomach, there’s more acid produced. Your gut slows down for nightly repairs – but repair is difficult if food is still passing through – it’s like trying to re-tarmac a road with traffic still flowing. It’s better to stop eating 2 or 3 hours before bed.

I’m in favour of working with your body, so Prof Satchin Panda’s research on Time Restricted Eating struck a chord. (Listen to Dr Rangan Chatterjee interviewing Prof Panda here.)  An 8-10 hour window has been found in the lab to protect against (and to improve existing) obesity, heart disease, diabetes, fatty liver disease, cholesterol and high blood sugar. Prof Panda recognises that we don’t have a choice when we get up; we have jobs to go to and children to take to school. But we can choose when we eat.

I like to try things out.  Initially it felt weird starting work early then having breakfast at 9:30am but months into my self-experiment, I feel great. After 7:30pm I don’t eat – that’s a 10h window. Even a 12h window gives benefits, say 7am to 7pm.  Give it a try and find out how you feel working with your body’s rhythms. (Check with your doctor about effects on medication.) There’s also a global study you can take part in via an app (mycircadianclock.org).

Top tip – Give Time Restricted Eating a try

Shopping List for Recipes

People have been snapping up my recipes like hot cakes when I’ve had a stand at events. And with a whole week of delicious main meals for £10.50 a head it’s no wonder.  Here’s a list of what I’ve posted:

1. Pasta with salmon sauce £1.60

2. One pot chicken £1.84

3. Spag bol £1.46

4. Liver and onion £0.81

5. Pork Stroganoff £1.87

6. Pork in mushroom and cream sauce £1.65

7. Leek and mushroom tagliatelle £1.27

Plus a bit of luxury

8. Pea and Chorizo risotto with Sea Bass £2.37

I was asked to put together a shopping list for the week and here it is!

I’ve used a limited palate of flavours to make your shopping complement more than one meal. Start by checking what you already have in your house. You can use things you’ve got instead of the ingredients listed so nothing is wasted. Add things to your shopping list that you need to buy.

If you’re new to cooking, break yourself in gently rather than stocking your cupboards with staple ingredients all in one go. Many of these ingredients keep for ages and will be enough for lots of meals once you have them.

Things to keep stock in your:

Cupboards

Brown Rice

Pasta

Stock cubes or bouillon powder

Tinned tomatoes (1 tin does recipes 1, 2 and 7, plus 3 for bolognaise if you make the big batch)

Tomato puree

Cornflour

Dried herbs – parsley, oregano or whatever you prefer

Olive oil

Coconut oil

Vinegar – white wine, balsamic or apple cider

Wholegrain mustard

Pantry

Sadly we tend not to have pantries now but garage or shed works well for long-lasting fresh ingredients.

Onions – why not buy a bag of small wonky ones?

Potatoes – these last for months if kept in paper rather than plastic, in a cool, dark place. We have a farm nearby that sells a big sack for £6 which we eat from October until March. Find out if you have one near you; it’s much cheaper than the supermarket.

Tip – Onions and potatoes last longer if not kept close together.

Fridge

Butter

Milk

Natural yoghurt

Lemon juice

Shopping list for the week

– for the week’s recipes for 2 people:

Fresh produce – the part of the supermarket to spend most time in

1 x lettuce or a cabbage

(Ready chopped salad leaves are very expensive and have been washed in chemicals and packed in an artificial atmosphere. They start to wilt as soon as you open the bag and a couple of days later, whatever is left is getting mushy and smells bad. Whole lettuces last much better. Keep them in the veg drawer at the bottom of the fridge so they don’t get too cold. Cabbage is very versatile. You can shred it finely for salad or steam it for veg. It lasts longer than lettuce, has more nutrients and is cheaper.)

1 x bag of spinach

(Best to buy this later on for recipe 6 then use it for salad or steam briefly for veg on other days.)

4 x carrots

8 x radishes

12 cherry or baby plum tomatoes

1 x bulb of garlic

(Try growing your own. Plant a clove or two from the bulb you buy, between September and December. Harvest in July.)

New potatoes for 2 people

1 x lemon or a bottle of juice

500g mushrooms

1 x large or 2 x small leeks

Cold Section

1 x tub double cream

Parmesan (buy it fresh, grate and freeze in containers)

4 x chicken thighs

2 x pork steaks

1 x pork tenderloin

1500g of beef mince to make the whole 16 portion batch or 200g to make just for 2 people.

300 g of liver

1 pack salami milano

Fresh herbs – parsley, dill (buy them fresh and freeze in bags or containers)

Frozen peas

Dry / tinned

1 x 213g tin of pink salmon (healthiest with bones – buy in brine, not oil)

To add the luxury recipe of the pea and chorizo risotto with sea bass:

2 x very small sea bass fillets

2 x blobs of chorizo

Risotto rice

You don’t need to go down the ready meal aisles at all so you save time as well as money when you shop.

Enjoy your cooking, enjoy your food, enjoy better health when you give up processed food!

 

Bonus Recipe

 

Leek and Mushroom Tagliatelle

Different shapes of pasta interact with different types of sauces. This seems to go well with flat ribbons, hence tagliatelle. I made the one in the picture with pizzoccheri or you can use something else if you prefer. Spiralized courgette (courgetti) makes a good substitute for pasta if you’re avoiding wheat or watching your weight.

(Incidentally, the g in tagliatelle is silent so it should sound like tal  iatelle, not tag.)

Chop a large leek or two small ones 50p

into coins about ½” (1cm) wide. Lay these flat and cut in half.

Wash the pieces well under running water in a colander and shake to drain.

Fry for 3 mins in a knob of butter or tbsp olive oil 8p

in a large frying pan.

Chop two handfuls of mushrooms and add to the pan 45p

Turn down the heat

Add: – 1/3 tin chopped tomatoes 12p

– squirt of tomato puree (~8 or 10”) 5p

– a chopped up stock cube 7p

– (or a desert spoon of bouillon powder 15p)

– good pinch of dried oregano 4p

– good pinch of dried parsley 4p

Season with salt and pepper

Cover with a lid, simmer gently for 10 mins, stirring occasionally.

Meanwhile, cook your pasta in fast-boiling, salted water 25p

At the end add 10 slices of salami Milano 59p to the sauce

Mix 2 tsp cornflour with a little cold water 2p, add, and heat to thicken

Drain the pasta, stir some butter or olive oil 8p

Top with the sauce and a good sprinkle of Parmesan 25p

Total for this taste of Italy £2.54. That’s £1.27 per person.

For a vegetarian meal, add double the mushrooms at the start instead of the salami at the end, £2.48 or £1.24 per person.

 

Next –  I’ve been asked for a shopping list for the full set – coming soon!

 

Picnics

One of the joys of summer is eating al fresco. A picnic is an essential part of a summer outing.

Have you noticed that food tastes better when we eat it outside? Psychologists have found that our physical sensations and emotional responses are greatly improved by the power of our perception of our environment. Restaurants have applied this science to their décor, choosing colour, patterns and music to set the mood. The same food actually tastes different depending on the wallpaper!

We also connect enjoyment of food with family memories: a favourite outdoor spot, the smell of grass and wild flowers, the sound of trees rustling in the breeze, the feel of warm sand on bare feet. Taking Jack LaLanne’s idea from July’s quote of the month, we need to be nearer to nature to be happy.    And when our brains are stimulated, our taste buds step up a notch.

So, what food to take on your picnic? On TV you’ll see images of unhealthy fizzy drinks, crisps, cheese processed almost to the point of being plastic and all manner of factory-made nibbles. When you’re getting back to the great outdoors, nature and all things real I’m sure you’ll want better than fake food.

Sandwiches are common but often dry, dull and too heavy on bread to be a good choice for lunch. Instead try boiled eggs, cheeses, salami, lettuce, tomatoes, sticks of crunchy carrot and celery, cooling cucumber, creamy avocado, peppery radishes, spicy spring onions, ham rolled round cream cheese, small bread rolls with butter. My grandmother’s special was fried chicken in herby breadcrumbs – so tasty!

Fruit is nice and juicy although it can attract wasps and invite the biting midge to suck your sweet blood. Use it to make a refreshing infusion by adding a few slices of apple, lemon and strawberry to a big bottle of water. Chill it well before you set off.

June’s post had ideas for drinks.

Share the pleasure by eating all together sitting at a picnic table or on a rug. Here’s how they do it in France where people are still healthy and slim.

Top tip – enjoy a real food picnic.

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Quote of the Month

He noticed walking down the street that people weren’t smiling.  You’ll see the same thing here, even though we have everything – a roof over our heads, food on the table, clothes, technology.

During the holidays this year, smile and make a note every day of something you are thankful for – or better still, three things.

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And get outside – even if you just sit in your own garden or visit the local park; anywhere with trees and plants to cheer you.

Special Offer – Get Ready for the Holidays

The schools break up soon so here’s a special offer to help you get ready for the beach, activities, fun and whatever else you have planned for your holidays.

Pic by rawpixel.com

From now until the 21st of July, I’m giving you a 10% discount on 1-to-1 consultations. That means they’ll be not £65 but £58. It’s first come, first served until I run out of the slots I have.

The sooner we talk, the longer you’ll have with your better eating habits before you go away.

I shared this with subscribers to my Eat Well News at the end of June so they booked this week. Sign up here to be the first to hear about future offers.