CLANGERS for health

I bought his boook Staying Alive

Recently I went to see Dr Phil Hammond at Keswick’s Theatre by the Lake. Hilarious as always, Dr Phil brought a serious message. The NHS is in trouble (we’d noticed) and the best way we can help is ….. to use it less. That means looking after ourselves so we need less medical intervention.

“Health care begins with self-care.”

He wants us all to drop CLANGERS. Honestly, I make enough mistakes without encouragement but here’s what he meant:

Connect

Learn

   (be) Active

Notice

Give back

Eat well

Relax

Sleep

Connect doesn’t mean social media. A spreader of love and kindness, Dr Phil’s Connect means face to face conversations, shared joy and hugs. He even got the audience hugging each other.  I’ve seen people gathered round a cafe table, each playing with their own device, isolated whilst in company. We’re losing the ability to connect to the people we’re actually with.

We hear about the troubling rise of depression and anxiety amongst young people and the toxic effect of Facebook. Our ‘always on’ culture make us unhappy and doesn’t allow us to relax.  Even some of the rich and famous are switching to the liberation of dumb ‘phones, choosing when to go on line, and finding a life where you live in the moment somehow less cluttered.

Find out what difference it makes to eat together as a family as a shared pleasure.  The Italians and French love their food and lead the way; meals can last for hours with chat and laughter.  Calm, relaxed eating even aids your absorption of nutrients.

A survey showed that 73% of people felt happier after spending time doing things with others. Science, too backs up the benefits of physical contact. It increases the production of the love hormone oxytocin which reduces cravings for drugs, alcohol and sugar. Very useful if you’re trying to give up highly addictive processed food.

Top tip – drop your CLANGERS daily!

The tour lasts until 8th July – check here to see if Dr Phil is coming to your area.

 

Self Care

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Have you ever stopped while walking down a street to look at blossom or listen to birds singing? I wonder if you’ve sat and closed your eyes, just to relax. How long did you enjoy your moment before something inside you said, ‘That’s enough now – get going again.’ Our culture of work, speed and relentless busyness doesn’t seem to value self care and leaves us feeling guilty if we dare to pause. In my travels I speak to a lot of people who are putting their own needs last, attempting to keep up at the expense of their own health.  This sort of martyrish mentality might impress your boss/family/friends in the short term but it isn’t good – for you or them. Think of the safety announcement when you go on a plane, ‘fit your own mask first’. You’re of no help to anyone if you’ve collapsed.

Stress affects your weight too. In spite of our modern veneer, biologically we’re still the same as in the stone-age.  We’re programmed to survive tigers and famines. In a famine, you’ll automatically store fat, heighten your ability to recognise and desire for fattening foods and you won’t feel inclined to use up valuable energy on exercise. Faced with threats to life like tigers, you’ll automatically burn fat to become lean and quick. We haven’t evolved a specific response to email overload or financial worries. Your brain may well interpret low level, long term stress as famine. You can’t control this, the hormones made in response or the fat those hormones will make you store. Nutrition is fundamentally important to weight loss but for it not to be an uphill struggle, you need to address stress.

S/W Ver: 85.83.E7P

S/W Ver: 85.83.E7P

If you can eliminate the source, that’s best even if it’s difficult to do.  If not, make stress reduction a priority; a lunchtime walk in the woods, music, gardening, counselling, sport, art, mindfulness – to help you feel calm and safe.

Top tip – Prioritise stress reduction.